Army Staff Ride - Honoring Our Veterans

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Not seen every day

 

On Saturday, March 12th, two U.S. Army Black Hawk helicopters swooped in over the tree line at Saratoga National Historical Park

 

and dropped off a detachment of 18 officers, NCOs, and support soldiers. This was no standard training operation for these men and women, whose normal domain is the courtroom: these were JAG Corps (Judge Advocate General) members and members of the Army Reserve’s 7th Legal Operations Division, flown in courtesy of the New York Army National Guard’s 3rd Battalion, 142nd Aviation, out of Latham, N.Y.

 

Led by former seasonal park rangers Larry Arnold and Pat Niles, the program participants listened and learned as Saratoga Battlefield showed its ability to tell yet another valuable, if atypical, story: legal issues and the military.  


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On Saturday, March 12th, 2016 two U.S. Army Black Hawk helicopters swooped in over the tree line at Saratoga National Historical Park and dropped off a detachment of 18 officers, NCOs, and support soldiers. This was no standard training operation for these men and women, whose normal domain is the courtroom: these were JAG Corps (Judge Advocate General) members and members of the Army Reserve’s 7th Legal Operations Division, flown in courtesy of the New York Army National Guard’s 3rd Battalion, 142nd Aviation, out of Latham, N.Y.

Led by former seasonal park rangers Larry Arnold and Pat Niles, the program participants listened and learned as Saratoga Battlefield showed its ability to tell yet another valuable, if atypical, story: legal issues and the military.
A strange training spot? Not really. Landing in the area of the main British Camp and Burgoyne’s headquarters, the group’s several mile “ruck march,” with 45-pound packs, punctuated their training mission of getting historical context for the role of Judge Advocates in the Operational Law setting. After all, it was higher-level skilled legal negotiation and background that helped secure the rather lenient terms for the British in the Articles of Convention, the “surrender” document ending the Battles of Saratoga.
Of course, it was anything but drudgery. “Beyond the history, this is really just fun,” noted Staff Sgt. Corey Lehman, one of the training participants. “Any time we can get out for training is a good opportunity.”